New York Metropolitan Flora

Family: Sapindaceae

Acer pensylvanicum

By Science Staff

Not peer reviewed

Last Modified 01/29/2013

Nomenclature

List of Sapindaceae Genera

References to Sapindaceae

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  • Abrams, M. D.; Kubiske, M. E. 1990. Photosynthesis and water relations during drought in <em>Acer rubrum</em> L. genotypes from contrasting sites in central Pennsylvania. Funct. Ecol. 4: 727-733.
  • Abrams, M. D.; Kubiske, M. E.; Mostoller, S. A. 1994. Relating wet and dry year ecophysiology to leaf structure in contrasting temperate tree species. Ecology 75: 123-33.
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  • Anderson, R. 1999. Disturbance as a factor in the distribution of sugar maple and the invasion of Norway maple into a modified woodland. Rhodora 101: 264-273.
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  • Bailey, L. H. 1888. The black maple. Bot. Gaz. 13: 213-4.
  • Baker, H. G. 1986. Patterns of plant invasion in North America. In: Ecology of biological invasions of North America and Hawaii. Springer-Verlag, New York. , 96-110 pages.
  • Baldwin, I. T.; Schultz, J. T. 1984. Tannins lost from sugar maple (<em>Acer saccharum</em> Marsh) and yellow birch (<em>Betula allegheniensis</em> Britt.) leaf litter. Biol. Biochem. 16(4): 421-2.
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  • Barden, L. S. 1983. Size, age, and growth rate of trees in canopy gaps of a cove hardwood forest in the southern Appalachians. Castanea 48: 19-23.
  • Barrett, J. W.; Farnsworth, C. E.; Rutherford, W. Jr. 1962. Logging effects on regeneration and certain aspects of microclimate in northern hardwoods. J. Forest. 60(9): 630-9.
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  • Bartlett, R. M.; Matthes-Sears, U.; Larson, D. W. 1991. Microsite- and age-specific processes controlling natural populations of <em>Acer saccharum</em> at cliff edges. Canad. J. Bot. 69(3): 552-9.
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  • Bate-Smith, E. C. 1977. Astringent tannins of <em>Acer</em> species. Phytochemistry 16: 1421-6.
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  • Beaudet, M.; Messier, C. 1998. Growth and morphological responses of yellow birch, sugar maple and beech seedlings growing under a natural light gradient. Canad. J. Forest Res. 28: 1007-1015.
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  • Belostokov, G. P. 1961. Structure of the generative shoots of <em>Acer negundo</em> L. Bot. Zhurn. (Moscow & Lenengrad) 46: 863-9. (In Russian)
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  • Biesboer, D. D. 1975. Pollen morphology of the Aceraceae. Grana 15: 19-27.
  • Binggeli, P. 1990. Detection of protandry and protogyny in sycamore (<em>Acer pseudoplatanus</em> L.) from infructescences. Watsonia 18: 17-20.
  • Binggeli, P.; Rushton, B. S. 1988. Schizocarpic fruits in sycamore (<em>Acer pseudoplatanus</em> L.). BSBI News 49: 17-9.
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