New York Metropolitan Flora

Family: Hamamelidaceae

Hamamelis virginiana

By Steven D. Glenn & Angela Steward

Not peer reviewed

Last Modified 02/06/2013

Nomenclature

List of Hamamelidaceae Genera

References to Hamamelidaceae

  • Anderson, E.; Sax, K. 1935. Chromosome numbers in the Hamamelidaceae and their phylogenetic significance. J. Arnold Arbor. 16: 210-5.
  • Anderson, G. J.; Hill, J. D. 2002. Many to flower, few to fruit: the reproductive biology of <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em>. Amer. J. Bot. 89: 67-78.
  • Angelo, R.; Boufford, D. E. 2010. Atlas of the flora of New England: Magnoliidae and Hamamelidae. Rhodora 112: 244-326.
  • Angelov, M. N. et.al. 1996. Long- and short-term flooding effects on survival and sink-source relationships of swamp-adapted tree species. Tree Physiology 16: 477-484.
  • Baillon, H. 1871. Nouvelles notes sur les Hamamelidees. Adansonia 10: 120-37. (In French)
  • Baillon, H. 1871. Saxifragacees. Hist. Pl. 3: 325-464. (In French; see English translation by M.M. Hartog, Nat. Hist. Pl. 3: 323-464. 1874)
  • Battaglia, L. L.; Fore, S. A.; Sharitz, R. R. 2000. Seedling emergence, survival and size in relation to light and water availability in two bottomland hardwood species. J. Ecol. 88: 1041-1050.
  • Berry, E. W. 1920. The geological history of the sweet gum and witch hazel. Pl. World 22: 345-54.
  • Boerner, R. E. J. 1985. Foliar nutrient dynamics, growth, and nutrient use efficiency of <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em> in three forest microsites. Canad. J. Bot. 63: 1476-81.
  • Bogle, A. 1970. Floral morphology and vascular anatomy of the Hamamelidaceae: the apetalous genera of Hamamelidoidae. J. Arnold Arbor. 51: 310-66.
  • Bogle, A. L. 1968. Floral vascular anatomy and the nature of the hamamelidaceous flower. Ph.D. Dissertation Univ. Minnesota, St. Paul, MN,
  • Bogle, A. L. 1986. The floral morphology and vascular anatomy of the Hamamelidaceae: subfamily Liquidambaroideae. Ann. Missouri Bot. Gard. 73: 325-47.
  • Bogle, A. L.; Philbrick, C. T. 1980. A generic atlas of hamamelidaceous pollens. Contr. Gray Herb. 210: 29-103.
  • Bonner, F. T. 1967. Germination of sweetgum seed in response to light. J. Forest. 65(5): 339.
  • Bormann, F. H. 1953. Factors determining the role of loblolly pine and sweetgum in early old-field succession in the Piedmont of North Carolina. Ecol. Monogr. 23: 339-58.
  • Bradford, J. L.; Marsh, D. L. 1978. Comparative studies of the witch hazels, <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em> L. and <em>H. vernalis</em> Sarg. Proc. Arkansas Acad. Sci. 31: 29-31. (Abstr. in Excerpta Bot., A, 33(1):19. 1979.)
  • Britton, Elizabeth G. 1887. Elongation of the inflorescence in <em>Liquidambar</em>. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 14: 95-6.
  • Brown, C. L.; Kormanik, P. P. 1967. Suppressed buds on lateral roots of <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em>. Bot. Gaz. 128(3-4): 208-11.
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  • Clark, A. W. 1919. Seasonal variation in water content and in transpiration of leaves of <em>Fagus grandifolia, Hamamelis virginiana</em>, and <em>Quercus alba</em>. Contr. Bot. Lab. Morris Abor. Univ. Pennsylvania 4: 105-43.
  • Clatterbuck, W. K.; Hodges, J. D. 1988. Development of cherrybark oak and sweet gum in mixed, even-aged bottomland stands in central Mississippi, U.S.A. Canad. J. Forest Res. 18(1): 12-8.
  • Coladoanto, M. 1993. <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em>. ()
  • Coladoanto, M. 1992. <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em>. ()
  • Connor, S. 1995. Mystical, medicinal witch hazel. Arnoldia (Jamaica Plain) 55: 20-21.
  • Crane, P. R.; Blackmore, S. (eds.) (1989): 1989. Evolution, systematics and fossil history of the Hamamelidae. 2 Vols. Oxford University Press, New York.
  • Davidson, D. W. 1966. Response of six shrub species to light regimes in two controlled-environment rooms. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 93: 432-437.
  • De Steven, D. 1982. Seed production and seed predation in a temperate forest shrub (witch-hazel, <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em>). J. Ecol. 70: 437-43.
  • De Steven, D. 1991. Experiments on mechanisms of tree establishment in old-field succession: seedling survival and growth. Ecology 72: 1076-88.
  • De Steven, D. 1983. Floral ecology of witch-hazel (<em>Hamamelis virginiana</em>). Michigan Bot. 22: 163-71.
  • De Steven, D. 1991. Experiments on mechanisms of tree establishment in old-field succession: seedling emergence. Ecology 72: 1066-75.
  • De Steven, D. 1983. Reproductive consequences of insect seed predation in <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em>. Ecology 64: 89-98.
  • Den Uyl, D. 1962. Survival and growth of hardwood plantations on strip mine spoil banks of Indiana. J. Forest. 60(9): 603-6.
  • Dillenburg, L. R.; Sullivan, J. H.; Teramura, A. H. 1995. Leaf expansion and development of photosynthetic capacity and pigments in <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em> (Hamamelidaceae)- effects of UV-B radiation. Amer. J. Bot. 82(7): 878-85.
  • Dillenburg, L. R.; Teramura, A. H.; Forseth, I. N.; Whigham, D. F. 1995. Photosynthetic and biomass allocation responses of <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em> (Hamamelidaceae) to vine competition. Amer. J. Bot. 82(4): 454-61.
  • Dillenburg, L. R.; Whigham, D. F.; Teramura, A. H.; Forseth, I. N. 1993. Effects of vine competition of availability of light, water, and nitrogen to a tree host <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em>. Amer. J. Bot. 80: 244-52.
  • Downs, R. J.; Borthwick, H. A. 1956. Effects of photoperiod on growth of trees. Bot. Gaz. 117(4): 310-26.
  • Duncan, W. H. 1959. Leaf variation in <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em>. Castanea 24: 99-111.
  • Echternach, J. L.; Rose, R. K. 1987. Use of woody vegetation by beavers in southeastern Virginia USA. Virginia J. Sci. 38: 226-232.
  • Endress, P. 1970. Die Infloreszenzen der apetalen Hamamelidaceen, ihre grundsatzliche morpholigische und systematische Bedeutung. Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 90: 1-54. (In German, English summary)
  • Endress, P. 1967. Systematische studie uber die verwandtschaftlichen Beziehungen zwischen den Hamamelidaceen und Betulaceen. Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 87: 431-525. (In German, English summary)
  • Endress, P. K. 1976. Die Androeciumanlage bei polyandrischen Hamamelidaceen und ihre systematische Bedeutung. Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 97: 436-57. (In German, English summary)
  • Endress, P. K. 1987. Aspects of evolutionary differentiation of the Hamamelidaceae and the lower Hamamelidae. Pl. Syst. Evol. 162: 193-211.
  • Endress, P. K. 1989. A supregeneric taxonomic classification of the Hamamelidaceae. Taxon 38: 371-6.
  • Erdtman, G. 1946. Pollen morphology and plant taxonomy. VII. Notes on various families. Svensk Bot. Tidskr. 40: 77-84.
  • Ernst, W. R. 1963. The genera of Hamamelidaceae and Platanaceae in the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 44: 193-210.
  • Felter, H. W. 1922. The Eclectic Materia Medica, pharmacology and therapeutics (<em>Liquidambar</em>).
  • Flint, F. F. 1959. Development of the megagametophyte in <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em> L. Madrono 15: 25-9.
  • Flint, F. F. 1957. Megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis in <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em> L. Virginia J. Sci. 8: 185-9.
  • Flora of North America Editorial Committee. 1997. Flora of North America, Volume 3. Magnoliophyta: Magnoliidae and Hamamelidae. Oxford University Press, New York. , 590 pages.
  • Fordham, A. J. 1961. Propagation of <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em>. Arnoldia (Jamaica Plain) 21: 66.
  • Foster, S. 2000. Witch hazel, <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em>.
  • Fulling, E. H. 1953. American witch hazel - history, nomenclature and modern utilization. Econ. Bot. 7: 359-81.
  • Gaut, P. C.; Roberts, J. N. 1984. <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em> seed germination. Pl. Propag. 34: 334-342.
  • Gibson, H. H. 1905. American forest trees - 18. Red gum, <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em> L. Hardwood Rec. 20: 12-5.
  • Gleason, H. 1922. The witch hazels. J. New York Bot. Gard. 23: 17-9.
  • Goldblatt, P.; Endress, P. 1977. Cytology and evolution in Hamamelidaceae. J. Arnold Arbor. 58(1): 67-71.
  • Graenicher, S. 1906. Some notes on the pollination of flowers. Bull. Wisconsin Nat. Hist. Soc. 4: 12-21.
  • Gregory, E. L. 1888. Development of corky-wings on certain trees II. Bot. Gaz. 13: 281-7.
  • Hallier, H. 1903. Uber den Umfang, die Gliederung und die Verwandtschaft der Hamamelidaceen. Beih. Bot. Centralbl. 14: 247-60.
  • Hengst, G. E.; Dawson, J. O. 1994. Bark properties and fire resistance of selected tree species from the central hardwood region of North America. Canad. J. Forest Res. 24: 688-96.
  • Herrick, J. D.; Thomas, R. B. 2003. Leaf senescence and late-season net photosynthesis of sun and shade leaves of overstory sweetgum (<em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em>) grown in elevated and ambient carbon dioxide concentrations. Tree Physiology 23: 109-118.
  • Hesse, M. 1978. Entwicklungsgeschichte und Ultrastruktur von Pollenkitt und Exine bei nahe verwandten entomophilen und anemophilen Angiospermensippen: Ranunculaceae, Hamamelidaceae, Platanaceae und Fagaceae. Pl. Syst. Evol. 130: 13-42.
  • Hicks, D. J.; Hustin, D. L. 1989. Response of <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em> L. to canopy gaps in a Pennsylvania oak forest. Amer. Midl. Naturalist 121: 200-4.
  • Hoey, M. T.; Parks, C. R. 1994. Genetic diversity in <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em>, <em>L. formosana</em>, and <em>L. acalycina</em> (Hamamelidaceae). Syst. Bot. 19(2): 308-16.
  • Hoey, M. T.; Parks, C. R. 1991. Isozyme divergence between eastern Asian, North American, and Turkish species of <em>Liquidambar</em> (Hamamelidaceae). Amer. J. Bot. 78: 938-47.
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  • Holbrook, N. M.; Putz, F. E. 1989. Influence of neighbors on tree form: Effects of lateral shade and prevention of sway on the allometry of <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em> (Sweet Gum). Amer. J. Bot. 76(12): 1740-9.
  • Holm, T. 1931. The seedling of <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em> L. Rhodora 33(388): 81-92.
  • Holm, T. 1930. Leaf-variation in <em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em>. Rhodora 32: 95-100.
  • Hooker, J. D. 1883. <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em>. Bot. Mag. 108: pl. 6684.
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  • Hosner, J. F. 1958. The effects of complete inundation upon seedlings of six bottomland tree species. Ecology 39: 371-3.
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  • Jenne, G. E. 1966. A study of variation in North American <em>Hamamelis</em> L. (Hamamelidaceae). M.S. Thesis Vanderbilt Univ.,
  • Jensen, A. E. 1901. Structure of the stem bark of <em>Hamamelis virginiana</em> L. Pharm. Arch. 4: 121-123. (See also Proc. A. Pharm. Assoc. 49:409-413. 1901.)
  • Jha, U. N. 1977. Chemotaxonomy of the Hamamelidaceae. J. Indian Bot. Soc. 56(1): 44-8.
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  • King, B. L. 1997. An abnormal variant of sweetgum (<em>Liquidambar styraciflua</em> L.) from Caroline county, Virginia. Banisteria 9: 43-5.
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  • Kormanik, P. P.; Brown, C. L. 1969. Origin and development of epicormic branches in sweet gum.
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  • Li, H. M.; Mickey, L. J. 1988. Leaf architecture and systematics of the Hamamelidaceae sensu lato. Acta Phytotax. Sin. 26(2): 96-110. (In Chinese; English summary)
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