New York Metropolitan Flora

Genus: Magnolia

Magnolia virginiana Magnolia virginiana

By Science Staff

Not peer reviewed

Last Modified 02/15/2013

Back to Magnoliaceae

Nomenclature

Magnolia L., Sp. Pl. 1: 535. 1753. Gen. Pl. 240. 1754. TYPE: Magnolia virginiana L.

Talauma A. Juss., Gen. Pl. 281. 1789. TYPE: Talauma plumierii (Sw.) DC. (=Magnolia plumierii Sw.).

Yulania Spach, Hist. Nat. Vég. 7: 462. 1839. TYPE: Not designated.

Tulipastrum Spach, Hist. Nat. Vég. 7: 481. 1839. TYPE: Tulipastrum americanum Spach, nom. illeg. (=Magnolia acuminata L.).

Buergeria Siebold et Zucc., Fl. Jap. 1: 78. 1843. TYPE: Not designated.

Kobus Kaempf. ex Nieuwl., Amer. Midl. Naturalist 3: 297. 1914. TYPE: Unknown.

List of Magnolia Species

References to Magnolia

  • Afanasiev, M. 1937. A physiological study of dormancy in seed of Magnolia acuminata L. Ph.D. Dissertation Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY122 p.
  • Afanasiev, M. 1937. A physiological study of dormancy in seed of Magnolia acuminata. Cornell Univ. Agric. Exp. Sta. Mem. 208: 1-37.
  • Andrews, F. M. 1901. Karyokinesis in Magnolia and Liriodendron, with special reference to behavior of chromosomes. Beih. Bot. Centralbl. 11: 134-42.
  • Appleton, B. et.al. 1999. Evaluating trees for saltwater spray tolerance for oceanfront sites. J. Arboric. 25: 205-209.
  • Azuma, H. et.al. 2001. Molecular phylogeny of the Magnoliaceae: the biogeography of tropical and temperate disjunctions. Amer. J. Bot. 88: 2275-2285.
  • Azuma, H. et.al. 2011. Intraspecific sequnce variation of cpDNA shows two distinct groups within Magnolia virginiana L. of eastern North America and Cuba. Castanea 76: 118-123.
  • Baranova, M. A. 1962. The structure of stomata and epidermal cells in Magnoliales as related to the taxonomy of the genus Magnolia L. Bot. Zhurn. (Moscow & Lenengrad) 47: 1108-15. (In Russian?)
  • Basinger, M. A. 1999. Notes on some naturalized woody plant species new to Illinois. Trans. Illinois State Acad. Sci. 92: 32-36.
  • Bõrtels, A. 1974. Amerikanische Magnolien. Mitt. Deutsch. Dendrol. Ges. 67: 55-9. (In German)
  • Callaway, D. J. 1994. The World of Magnolias. Timber Press, Portland, OR. , 322 pages.
  • Callaway, D. J. 1994. Magnolias. B. T. Batsford, London. , 260 pages.
  • Canright, J. E. 1960. The comparative morphology and relationships of the Magnoliaceae. II. Carpels. Amer. J. Bot. 47: 145-55.
  • Coladoanto, M. 1991. Magnolia virginiana. ()
  • Collingwood, G. H. 1943. Cucumber tree. Amer. Forests 49: 352-3.
  • Dandy, J. E. 1927. Key to the species of Magnolia. J. Roy. Hort. Soc. 52: 260-4.
  • Daumann, E. 1930. Das Bl³tennektarium von Magnolia und die Futterk÷rper in der Bl³te von Calycanthus. Planta 11: 108-16. (In German)
  • Del Tredici, P. 1981. Magnolia virginiana in Massachusetts. Arnoldia (Jamaica Plain) 41: 36-49.
  • Demuth, P.; Santamour, F. S. 1978. Carotenoid flower pigments in Liriodendron and Magnolia. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 105: 65-6.
  • Earle, T. T. 1938. Origin of the seed coats in Magnolia. Amer. J. Bot. 25: 221-2.
  • Eaton, R. J. 1928. The present status of Magnolia virginiana in Massachusetts. Rhodora 30(358): 207-8.
  • Farr, C. H. 1918. Cell division by furrowing in Magnolia. Amer. J. Bot. 5: 379-95.
  • Figlar, R. B. 1998. Molecular analysis: a new look at umbrella magnolias. Arnoldia (Jamaica Plain) 57: 22-9.
  • Fogg, J. M. Jr. 1961. The temperate American Magnolias. Morris Arbor. Bull. 12: 51-8.
  • Freeman, O. M. 1951. New Magnolia hybrids. Natl. Hort. Mag. 30: 132-5.
  • Freeman, O. M. 1937. A new Magnolia hybrid. Natl. Hort. Mag. 16: 161-2.
  • Gibson, H. H. 1906. American forest trees - 39. Cucumber tree, Magnolia acuminata Linn. Hardwood Rec. 23: 16-7.
  • Good, R. D. 1925. The past and present distribution of Magnoliae. Ann. Bot. (London) 39: 409-30.
  • Gray, A. 1858. A short exposition on the structure of the ovule and seed coats of Magnolia. J. Linn. Soc. Bot. 2: 106-10.
  • Greller, A. M. et.al. 2011. Magnolia acuminata, M. macrophylla, and M. tripetala in oak-dominated forests on the North shore of Long Island, New York. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 138: 225-238.
  • Grier, N. M. 1917. Note on fruit of mountain Magnolia. Rhodora 19: 256.
  • Grieve, M. 1971. A Modern Herbal. 2 Vols. Dover Publications, Inc., New York. , 888 pages.
  • Hardin, J. W. 1954. An analysis of variation within Magnolia acuminata L. J. Elisha Mitchell Sci. Soc. 70: 298-312.
  • Hardin, J. W.; Jones, K. A. 1989. Atlas of foliar surface features in woody plants, X. Magnoliaceae of the United States. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 116: 164-73.
  • Harvill, A. M. 1964. The Magnolias of Virginia. Castanea 29: 186-8.
  • Heiser, C. B. Jr. 1962. Some observations on pollination and compatability in Magnolia. Proc. Indiana Acad. Sci. 72: 259-66.
  • Jack, J. G. 1889. Magnolia glauca in its most northern home. Gard. & Forest 2: 363-4.
  • Johnson, D. L. 1989. Species and cultivars of the genus Magnolia (Magnoliaceae) cultivated in the United States. M.S. Thesis Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY168 p.
  • Johnson, M. A.; Fairbrothers, D. E. 1965. Comparison and interpretation of serological data in the Magnoliaceae. Bot. Gaz. 126(4): 260-9.
  • Jones, K. A. 1988. Foliar surface features of the Magnoliaceae native in the United States. M.S. Thesis North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC,
  • Kennedy, G. G. 1916. Some historical data regarding the sweet bay and its station on Cape Ann. Rhodora 18): 205-12.
  • Kim, S. et.al. 2001. Phylogenetic relationships in family Magnoliaceae inferred from NDHF sequences. Amer. J. Bot. 88: 717-728.
  • Knapp, A. K.; Carter, G. A. 1998. Variability in leaf optical properties among 26 species from a broad range of habitats. Amer. J. Bot. 85: 940-946.
  • Leppik, E. E. 1976. Morphogenic stagnation in the evolution of Magnolia flowers. Phytomorphology 25(4): 451-64.
  • Li, J.; Conran, J. G. 2003. Phylogenetic relationships in Magnoliaceae subfam. Magnolioideae: a morphological cladistic analysis. Pl. Syst. Evol. 242: 33-47.
  • Maneval, W. B. 1914. The development of Magnolia and Liriodendron. Bot. Gaz. 67: 1-31.
  • McDaniel, J. C. 1967. Self-infruitfulness of some Magnolias. Morris Arbor. Bull. 18: 64-9.
  • McDaniel, J. C. 1963. Recent hybridizations with American Magnolias. Inter. Prop. Soc. Comb. Proc. 13: 124-32.
  • McDaniel, J. C. 1966. Variations in the sweet bay magnolias. Morris Arbor. Bull. 17: 7-12.
  • McVaugh, R. 1936. The cucumber tree in eastern New York. Castanea 1: 39-41.
  • Mitchell, R. S.; Beal, E. D. (eds.) (1979): 1979. Magnoliaceae through Ceratophyllaceae of New York State. Vol. NY State Museum Bull. 435. Vol. Contributions to a Flora of New York State II.. Univ. of the state of NY, Albany, NY.
  • Murray, E. 1972. A Magnolia species checklist. Kalmia 4: 1-12.
  • Murray, E. 1973. Magnolia species descriptions. Kalmia 5: 1-17.
  • Peigler, R. S. 1988. A review of pollination of Magnolia by beetles, with a collecting survey made in the Carolinas. Magnolia 45: 1-7.
  • Pickering, J. L.; Fairbrothers, D. E. 1967. A serological and disc electrophoretic investigation of Magnolia taxa. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 94: 468-79.
  • Pickering, J. L.; Fairbrothers, D. E. 1966. A serological investigation of Magnolia hybrids and parental species. Bull. Serol. Mus. 36: 3-7.
  • Primack, R. B.; Hendry, E.; Del Tredici, P. 1986. Current status of Magnolia virginiana in Massachusetts. Rhodora 88(855): 357-65.
  • Qiu, Y. L.; Parks, C. R. 1994. Disparity of allozyme variation levels in three Magnolia (Magnoliaceae) species from the southeastern United States. Amer. J. Bot. 81(10): 1300-8.
  • Rhoads, A. F. 1994. Magnolia tripetala in Pennsylvania. Bartonia 58: 75-77.
  • Rockwell, H. C. 1966. The genus Magnolia in the United States.. M.A. Thesis West Virginia Univ., Morgantown,
  • Rudkin, W. H. 1883. Magnolia glauca L., on Long Island. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 10: 95. (see also Miller,ES (1885))
  • Santamour, F. S. 1970. Implications of cytology and biochemistry for Magnolia hybridization. Newslett. Amer. Magnolia Soc. 7: 8-10.
  • Santamour, F. S. 1965. Biochemical studies in Magnolia. Morris Arbor. Bull. 16-17: 43-8, 63-4(16); 13, 65-8(17).
  • Sargent, C. S. 1891. Magnolia. In: Silva North America. ,
  • Song, Q. et al. et.al. 1998. Sesquiterpenes from southern Magnolia virginiana. Phytochemistry 47: 221-6.
  • Spongberg, S. A. 1976. Magnoliaceae hardy in temperate North America. J. Arnold Arbor. 57: 250-312.
  • Spongberg, S. A. 1974. A tentative key to the cultivated magnolias. Arnoldia (Jamaica Plain) 34(1): 1-11.
  • Spring, J. J. 1962. The propagation of Magnolias from seed. J. Calif. Hort. Soc. 23: 48-50.
  • Thien, L. B. 1974. Floral biology of Magnolia. Amer. J. Bot. 61(10): 1037-45.
  • Thien, L. B.; Heimermann, W. H.; Holman, R. T. 1975. Floral odors and quantitative taxonomy of Magnolia and Liriodendron. Taxon 24: 557-68.
  • Thorgrimson, O. B. 1947. Magnolias- American species. Arbor. Bull. 10: 6-7;26-7.
  • Tobe, J. D. 1993. A molecular systematic study of eastern North American species of Magnolia L. Ph.D. Dissertation Clemson Univ., Clemson, S.C.144 p.
  • Treseder, N. G. 1972. Magnolias and their cultivation. J. Roy. Hort. Soc. 97: 336-46.
  • Treseder, N. G. 1978. Magnolias. Faber & Faber, London. , xviii, 243 pages.
  • Tryon, E. H.; True, R. P. 1968. Radial increment response of Appalachian hardwood species to a spring freeze. J. Forest. 66(6): 488-91.
  • University of British Columbia Arboretum 1995. An ethnobotany of the UBC Arboretum.
  • Whitaker, T. W. 1933. Chromosome number and relationship in the Magnoliales. J. Arnold Arbor. 14: 376-85.
  • Wilber, G. M. 1885. The Long Island station for Magnolia glauca. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 12: 87. (See also Rudkin,W.H. 1883.)
  • Willis, O. R. 1870. Magnolia glauca. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 1: 11.
  • Wood, C. E. 1958. The genera of the woody Ranales of the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 39(3): 296-346.
  • Xu, F. X. 2003. Sclerotesta morphology and its systematic implications in magnoliaceous seeds. Bot. J. Linn. Soc. 142: 407-424.
  • Zampella, R. A. et.al. 1999. Sixe-class structure and hardwood recruitment in Atlantic white cedar swamps of the New Jersey pinelands. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 126: 268-275.