New York Metropolitan Flora

Genus: Picea

By Science Staff

Not peer reviewed

Last Modified 03/05/2013

Back to Pinaceae

Nomenclature

Picea A. Dietr., Fl. Berlin 1(2): 794. 1824. TYPE: Picea rubra A. Dietr., nom. illeg. (=Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.).

Peuce L. C. Rich., Ann. Mus. Par. 16: 298. 1810. TYPE: Unknown.

Key to the species of Picea

1. Twigs glabrous...2
1. Twigs pubescent...4

2. Leaves 2-4 cm long, spreading at right angles from the branch...Picea pungens
2. Leaves 0.8-2 (-2.5) cm long, arching forward from the branch...3

3. Leaves malodorous when crushed; winter buds obtuse...Picea glauca
3. Leaves not malodorous when crushed; winter buds acute...Picea abies

4. Decurrent ridges on twigs below needle attachment rounded on top side; cones generally 2.5 cm or longer...Picea rubens
4. Decurrent ridges on twigs below needle attachment flattened on top side; cones generally less than 2.5 cm...Picea mariana

List of Picea Species

References to Picea

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