New York Metropolitan Flora

Genus: Fagus

Fagus grandifolia

By Steven D. Glenn

Not peer reviewed

Last Modified 01/25/2013

Back to Fagaceae

Nomenclature

Fagus L., Sp. Pl. 997. 1753, sp. nonnull. exclud.

Fagus sect. Eufagus A.DC., Prodr. 16,2: 118. 1864, p. p. typ.

LECTOTYPE: F. sylvatica L. (see Britton & A.Br., Ill. Fl. N.U.S. ed. 2. 1: 614. 1913).

List of Fagus Species

References to Fagus

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  • Amthor, J. S.; Gill, D. S.; Bormann, F. H. 1990. Autumnal laef conductance and apparent photosythesis by saplings and sprouts in a recently disturbed northern hardwood forest. Oecologia 84: 93-8.
  • Aufderheide, H. 1931. Chromosome numbers in Fagus grandifolia and Quercus virginiana. Butler Univ. Bot. Stud. 2(5): 45-52.
  • Barden, L. S. 1983. Size, age, and growth rate of trees in canopy gaps of a cove hardwood forest in the southern Appalachians. Castanea 48: 19-23.
  • Barker, M. J. et.al. 1997. Micropropagation of juvenile and mature American beech. Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Culture 51: 209-213.
  • Barrett, J. W.; Farnsworth, C. E.; Rutherford, W. Jr. 1962. Logging effects on regeneration and certain aspects of microclimate in northern hardwoods. J. Forest. 60(9): 630-9.
  • Batista, W. B.; Platt, W. J.; Macchiavelli, R. E. 1998. Demography of a shade-tolerant tree (Fagus grandifolia) in a hurricane-disturbed forest. Ecology 79: 38-53.
  • Beaudet, M.; Messier, C. 1998. Growth and morphological responses of yellow birch, sugar maple and beech seedlings growing under a natural light gradient. Canad. J. Forest Res. 28: 1007-1015.
  • Bennett, K. D. 1985. The spread of Fagus grandifolia across eastern North America during the last 18000 years. J. Biogeogr. 12: 147-64.
  • Benninghoff, W. S.; Gebben, A. I. 1960. Phytosociological studies of some beech-maple stands in Michigan's Lower Peninsula. Pap. Michigan Acad. Sci. 45: 83-91.
  • Berkeley, E. E. 1931. Marcescent leaves of certain species of Quercus. Bot. Gaz. 92: 85-93. (Also Acer, Fagus)
  • Boerner, R. E. J.; Brinkman, J. A. 1996. Ten years of tree seedling establishment and mortality in an Ohio deciduous forest complex. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 123: 309-17.
  • Bohn, K. K.; Nyland, R. D. 2003. Forecasting development of understory American beech after partial cutting in uneven-aged northern hardwood stands. Forest Ecol. & Manag. 180: 453-461.
  • Boman, J. S.; Casper, B. B. 1995. Differential postdispersal seed predation in disturbed and intact temperate forest. Amer. Midl. Naturalist 134: 107-116.
  • Brett, D. W. 1964. The inflorescence of Fagus and Castanea and the evolution of the cupules of the Fagaceae. New Phyt. 63: 96-117.
  • Bruederle, L. P.; Stearns, F. W. 1985. Ice storm damage to a southern Wisconsin mesic forest. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 112(2): 167-75.
  • Buell, M. F.; Buell, H. F.; Small, J. A. 1973. Periodicity of tree growth in Hutcheson Memorial Forest. William L. Hutcheson Memorial For. Bull. 3: 24-6.
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  • Busby, P. E. et.al. 2008. Multiple and interacting disturbances lead to Fagus grandifolia dominance in coastal New England. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 135: 346-359.
  • Camp, W. H. 1950. A biogeographic and paragenetic analysis of the American beech (Fagus). Amer. Philos. Soc. Year Book 1950: 166-9.
  • Canham, C. D. 1988. Growth and canopy architecture of shade-tolerant trees: Response to canopy gaps. Ecology 69: 786-95.
  • Canham, C. D. 1990. Suppression and release during canopy recruitment in Fagus grandifolia. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 117: 1-7. (Also Acer)
  • Canham, C. D. 1984. Canopy recruitment in shade tolerant tree species: the response of Acer saccharum and Fagus grandifolia to canopy openings. Ph.D. Thesis Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY174 p.
  • Celakovsky, L. 1890. Ueber die Cupula von Fagus und Castanea. Jahrb. Wiss. Bot. 21: 128-161. (In German)
  • Chadwick, L. C. 1939. New England hurricane damage to trees. Arborist's News 4(1): 1-4.
  • Clark, A. W. 1919. Seasonal variation in water content and in transpiration of leaves of Fagus grandifolia, Hamamelis virginiana, and Quercus alba. Contr. Bot. Lab. Morris Abor. Univ. Pennsylvania 4: 105-43.
  • Cleavitt, N. L. et.al. 2008. Growth and survivorship of american beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) seedlings in a northern hardwood forest following a mast event. J. Torrey Bot. Soc. 135: 328-345.
  • Coladoanto, M. 1991. Fagus grandifolia. ()
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  • Curtis, R. O.; Rushmore, F. M. 1958. Some effects of stand density and deer browsing on reproduction in an Adirondack hardwood stand. J. Forest. 56: 116-21.
  • Cypher, J.; Boucher, D. H. 1982. Beech-maple coexistence and seedling growth rates at Mount Saint Hilaire, Quebec. Canad. J. Bot. 60: 1279-81.
  • Davis, M. B.; Woods, K. D.; Webb, S. L.; Futyma, R. P. 1986. Dispersal versus climate: expansion of Fagus and Tsuga into the upper Great Lakes region. Vegetatio 67: 93-103.
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  • Dengler, N. G.; MacKay, L. B.; Gregory, L. M. 1975. Cell enlargement and tissue differentiation during leaf expansion in beech, Fagus grandifolia. Canad. J. Bot. 53(23): 2846-65.
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  • Denk, T.; Meller, B. 2001. Systematic significance of the cupule/nut complex in living and fossil Fagus. Int. J. Plant Sci. 162: 869-897.
  • Dibello, F. J.; Arthur, S. M.; Krohn, W. B. 1990. Food habits of sympatric coyotes, red foxes, and bobcats in Maine. Canad. Field-Naturalist 104: 403-8.
  • Diller, O. D. 1935. The relation of temperature and precipitation to the growth of beech in northern Indiana. Ecology 16: 72-81.
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  • Dostal, R. 1927. Uber die Sommerperiodizitõt bei Quercus und Fagus. Ber. Deutsch. Bot. Ges. 45: 436-446.
  • Elias, T. S. 1971. The genera of Fagaceae in the southeastern United States. J. Arnold Arbor. 52: 159-95.
  • Evans, C. A. et.al. 2005. Beech bark disease: proceedings of the beech bark disease symposium, Saranac Lake, New York, June 16-18, 2004. (149 pages)
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  • Forcier, L. K. 1973. Seedling pattern and population dynamics, and the reproductive strategies of sugar maple, beech and yellow birch. Ph.D. Dissertation Yale Univ., New Haven, CT,
  • Forman, L. L. 1966. On the evolution of cupules in the Fagaceae. Kew Bull. 18: 385-419.
  • Friesner, R. C. 1941. A preliminary study of growth in the beech, Fagus grandifolia, by the dendrographic method. Butler Univ. Bot. Stud. 5: 85-94.
  • Fritts, H. C. 1956. Relations of radial growth of beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) to some environmental factors in a central Ohio forest during 1954-55. Ph.D. Dissertation Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH,
  • Fritts, H. C. 1959. The relation of radial growth to maximum and minimum temperatures in three tree species. Ecology 40(2): 261-5.
  • Fritts, H. C. 1958. An analysis of radial growth of beech in a central Ohio forest during 1954-55. Ecology 39: 705-20.
  • Garrison, H. J. 1956. Floral morphology and ontogeny of Fagus grandifloia Ehrh. Ph.D. Thesis Pennsylvania State Univ.101 p. (see also Diss. Abstr. 17:2777-2778. 1957.)
  • Gavin, D. 1992. Effects of beech bark disease on radial growth of American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) in New Hampshire. M.S. Thesis Dartmouth,
  • Glase, J. C.; Granet, K. 1978. Bark chlorophyll in the American beech (Fagus grandifolia) varies with bark aspect. Amer. Midl. Naturalist 100: 510-2.
  • Good, N. F. 1968. A study of natural replacement of chestnut in six stands in the highlands of New Jersey. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 95: 240-53. (Also Acer, Betula, & Fagus)
  • Good, N. F.; Good, R. E. 1972. Population dynamics of tree seedlings and saplings in a mature eastern hardwood forest. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 99: 172-8.
  • Greene, D. F.; Johnson, E. A. 1994. Estimating the mean annual seed production of trees. Ecology 75: 642-7.
  • Gysel, L. W. 1971. A 10-year analysis of beechnut production and use in Michigan. J. Wildl. Managem. 35: 516-9.
  • Haines, E. M. 1965. The distribution of Fagus grandifolia in Hutcheson Memorial Forest, New Jersey. Bull. New Jersey Acad. Sci. 10: 12-21.
  • Hane, E. N. 2003. Indirect effects of beech bark disease on sugar maple seedling survival. Canad. J. Forest Res. 33: 807-813.
  • Hane, E. N. et.al. 2003. Phytotoxicity of American beech leaf leachate to sugar maple seedlings in a greenhouse experiment. Canad. J. Forest Res. 33: 814-821.
  • Hanna, W. J.; Grant, C. L. 1962. Spectrochemical analysis of the foliage of certain trees and ornamentals for 23 elements. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 89: 293-302.
  • Hannah, P. R. 1987. Potential of beech and striped maple to dominate regeneration on eastern hardwood sites. In: Proceedings of the Central Hardwood Forest Conference, February 24-26, 1987, Knoxville, Tennessee. Univ. Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. , 511-2 pages.
  • Harcombe, P. A.; White, B. D.; Glitzenstein, J. S. 1982. Factors influencing distribution and first-year survivorship of a cohort of beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.). Castanea 47: 148-57.
  • Hardin, J. W.; Johnson, G. P. 1985. Atlas of foliar surface features in woody plants, VIII. Fagus and Castanea (Fagaceae) of eastern North America. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 112: 11-20.
  • Held, M. E. 1980. An analysis of factors related to sprouting and seeding in the occurrence of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American Beech) in the eastern deciduous forest of North America. Ph.D. Dissertation Ohio Univ., Athens, OH,
  • Held, M. E. 1983. Pattern of beech regeneration in the east-central United States. Bull. Torrey Bot. Club 110: 55-62.
  • Held, M. E. 1978. Multivariate analysis of the relationship between environmental variables and reproduction in Fagus grandifolia. Bull. Ecol. Soc. Amer. 59: 78.
  • Held, M. E.; Jones Held, S. 1990. Morphological and flavonoid analysis of variation in Fagus grandifolia (Fagaceae). Trans. Kentucky Acad. Sci. 51(1-2): 57-60.
  • Held, M. E.; Wistendahl, W. A. 1977. An analysis of factors related to reproduction from sprouts and seeds in the occurrence of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. (American Beech) in Ohio and Kentucky. Bull. Ecol. Soc. Amer. 58: 47.
  • Henry, J. D.; Swan, J. M. A. 1974. Reconstructing forest history from live and dead plant material - an approach to the study of forest succession in southwest New Hampshire. Ecology 55: 772-83.
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  • Houston, D. B.; Houston, D. R. 1994. Variation in American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) isozyme analysis of genetic structure in selected stands. Silvae Genet. 43: 277-284.
  • Houston, D. B.; Houston, D. R. 2000. Allozyme genetic diversity among Fagus grandifolia trees resistant or susceptible to beech bark disease in natural populations. Canad. J. Forest Res. 30: 778-789.
  • Houston, D. R. 1985. Dieback and declines of urban trees. J. Arboric. 11(3): 65-72.
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  • Johnson, W. C.; Adkisson, C. S. 1985. Dispersal of beech (Fagus grandifolia) nuts by blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata) in fragmented landscapes. Amer. Midl. Naturalist 113: 319-24.
  • Jones, R. H.; Raynal, D. J. 1988. Root sprouting in American beech (Fagus grandifolia): effects of root injury, root exposure, and season. Forest Ecol. & Manag. 25: 79-90.
  • Jones, R. H.; Raynal, D. J. 1986. Spatial distribution and development of root sprouts in Fagus grandifolia (Fagaceae). Amer. J. Bot. 73: 1723-31.
  • Jones, R. H.; Raynal, D. J. 1987. Root sprouting in American beech: Production, survival,and the effect of parent vigor. Canad. J. Forest Res. 17: 539-44.
  • Jones, R. H.; Raynal, D. J. 1987. Factors influencing the initiation of root sprouts in American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.). Proc. Rochester Acad. Sci. 16(3): 103.
  • Jurik, T. W. 1986. Temporal and spatial patterns of specific leaf weight in successional northern hardwood tree species. Amer. J. Bot. 73(8): 1083-92.
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