New York Metropolitan Flora

Family: Cupressaceae

Thuja occidentalis
Thuja occidentalis   L.  -  Arbor-vitae
Photo © by Brooklyn Botanic Garden
Taken by G. A. Kalmbacher.

By Steven D. Glenn

Not peer reviewed

Last Modified 01/18/2012

Key to the genera of Cupressaceae

1. Leaves linear, alternate, 7 mm in length or longer, divergent; cone scales spiral...2
1. Leaves scale-like, opposite or whorled, less than 7 mm in length, usually appressed; cone scales opposite...3

2. Leaves alternate in a flat plane, straight, distal half divergent from stem...Taxodium
2. Leaves spirally alternate, curved, distal half parallel to stem...Cryptomeria

3. Cone berry-like or drupe-like, somewhat fleshy...Juniperus
3. Cone woody or leathery...4

4. Cone globose, the scales peltate, not overlapping...Chamaecyparis
4. Cone oblong-ovoid, the scales overlapping...Thuja

List of Cupressaceae Genera

References to Cupressaceae

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  • Adams, R. P. 1988. Termitcidal activities in the heartwood bark-sapwood and leaves of Juniperus spp. from the USA. Biochem. Syst. Ecol. 16: 453-456.
  • Adams, R. P. 1998. The leaf essential oils and chemotaxonomy of Juniperus sect. Juniperus. Biochem. Syst. Ecol. 26: 637-645.
  • Adams, R. P. 1969. Chemosystematic and numerical studies in natural populations of Juniperus. Ph.D. Dissertation Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX,
  • Adams, R. P. 1986. Geographic variation in Juniperus silicicola and J. virginiana of the southeastern United States: multivariate analysis of morphology and terpenoids. Taxon 35: 61-75.
  • Adams, R. P. et.al. 2011. Taxonomy and evolution of Juniperus communis: insight from DNA sequencing and SNPs. Phytologia 93: 185-197.
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  • Adams, R. P.; Nguyen, S. 2007. Post-Pleistocene geographic variation in Juniperus communis in North America. Phytologia 89: 43-57.
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  • Chaturvedi, M. 1981. Studies on the pollen grains of Juniperus L. Current Science 50: 548-9.
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