New York Metropolitan Flora

Family: Cupressaceae

Thuja occidentalis

By Steven D. Glenn

Not peer reviewed

Last Modified 01/18/2012

Nomenclature

List of Cupressaceae Genera

References to Cupressaceae

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  • Adams, R. P. 1987. Investigation of <em>Juniperus</em> species of the United States for new sources of cedarwood oil. Econ. Bot. 41: 48-54.
  • Adams, R. P. 2000. Systematics of <em>Juniperus</em> section <em>Juniperus</em> based on leaf essential oils and random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs). Biochem. Syst. Ecol. 28: 515-528.
  • Adams, R. P. 1988. Termitcidal activities in the heartwood bark-sapwood and leaves of <em>Juniperus</em> spp. from the USA. Biochem. Syst. Ecol. 16: 453-456.
  • Adams, R. P. 1998. The leaf essential oils and chemotaxonomy of <em>Juniperus</em> sect. <em>Juniperus</em>. Biochem. Syst. Ecol. 26: 637-645.
  • Adams, R. P. 1969. Chemosystematic and numerical studies in natural populations of <em>Juniperus</em>. Ph.D. Dissertation Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX,
  • Adams, R. P. 1986. Geographic variation in <em>Juniperus silicicola</em> and <em>J. virginiana</em> of the southeastern United States: multivariate analysis of morphology and terpenoids. Taxon 35: 61-75.
  • Adams, R. P. et.al. 2011. Taxonomy and evolution of <em>Juniperus communis</em>: insight from DNA sequencing and SNPs. Phytologia 93: 185-197.
  • Adams, R. P.; Demeke, T. 1993. Systematic relationships in <em>Juniperus</em> based on random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs). Taxon 42: 553-571.
  • Adams, R. P.; Nguyen, S. 2007. Post-Pleistocene geographic variation in <em>Juniperus communis</em> in North America. Phytologia 89: 43-57.
  • Adams, R. P.; Thornburg, D. 2010. Seed dispersal in <em>Juniperus</em>: a review. Phytologia 92: 424-434.
  • Ahlgren, C. E. 1957. Phenological observations of nineteen native tree species in northeastern Minnesota. Ecology 38: 622-8.
  • Ahlgren, C. E.; Ahlgren, I. F. 1981. Some effects of different forest litters on seed germination and growth. Canad. J. Forest Res. 11: 710-714.
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  • Andre, D. 1956. Contribution a l'Etude morphologique du cone femelle de quelques gymnospermes (Cephalotaxees, Juniperoidees, Taxacees). Nat. Monspel. Bot. 8: 3-35. (In French)
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  • Archambault, S.; Bergeron, Y. 1992. Discovery of a living 900 year-old northern white cedar, <em>Thuja occidentalis</em>, in northwestern Quebec. Canad. Field-Naturalist 106: 192-5.
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  • Bannan, M. W. 1955. The vascular cambium and radial growth in <em>Thuja occidentalis</em> L. Canad. J. Bot. 33: 113-38.
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  • Boyd, H. 1951. Eastern red cedar (<em>Juniperus virginiana</em> L.) - a list of references.
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  • Boyle, O. D.; Lathrop, R. G.; Hartman, Jean Marie 1996. Reestablishment of Atlantic white cedar after fire. (Abstract)
  • Brett, W. J.; Singer, A. C. 1973. Chlorophyll concentration in leaves of <em>Juniperus virginiana</em> L., measured over a 2-year period. Amer. Midl. Naturalist 90: 194-200.
  • Briand, C. H.; Posluszny, U.; Larson, D. W. 1993. Influence of age and growth rate on radial anatomy of annual rings of <em>Thuja occidentalis</em> L. (eastern white cedar). Int. J. Plant Sci. 154(3): 406-11.
  • Briand, C. H.; Posluszny, U.; Larson, D. W. 1992. Comparative seed morphology of <em>Thuja occidentalis</em> (eastern white cedar) from upland and lowland sites. Canad. J. Bot. 70(2): 434-8.
  • Briand, C. H.; Posluszny, U.; Larson, D. W. 1992. Differential axis architecture in <em>Thuja occidentalis</em> (eastern white cedar). Canad. J. Bot. 70(2): 340-8.
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  • Brundrett, M.; Murase, G.; Kendrick, B. 1990. Comparative anatomy of roots and mycorrhizae of common Ontario trees. Canad. J. Bot. 68: 551-78. (French summary)
  • Brunsfeld, S. J. et.al. 1994. Phylogenetic relationships among the genera of Taxodiaceae and Cupressaceae: evidence from rbcL sequences. Syst. Bot. 19: 235-62.
  • Brush, W. D. 1947. Knowing your trees: Atlantic whitecedar - <em>Chamaecyparis thyoides</em> (L.) B.S.P. Amer. Forests 53: 218-9.
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  • Buchholz, J. T. 1948. Generic and subgeneric distribution of the Coniferales. Bot. Gaz. 110: 80-91.
  • Buchholz, J. T. 1920. Embryo development and polyembryony in relation to the phylogeny of conifers. Amer. J. Bot. 7: 125-45.
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  • Burns, R. M.; Honkala, B. H. (eds.) (1990): 1990. Silvics of North America: Vol. 1, Conifers. Agricultural Handbook No. 654. USDA, Forest Service, Washington, D.C..
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  • Butts, D.; Buchholz, J. T. 1940. Cotyledon numbers in conifers. Trans. Illinois State Acad. Sci. 33: 58-62.
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